Canon Sureshot Z135 ~ 2021

I got a job lot of old film cameras at the end of last year one of which is a Canon Sureshot Z135. I put a roll of Kodak Portra 400 in it and carried about with me when I was out and about. It’s a sturdy little camera with the usual Canon programs to choose from but no manual controls. It has a 38-135mm fixed zoom lens, and an annoying pop up flash that pops up whether you want it or not.

I wasn’t too impressed with the quality of the shots, quite grainy considering portra is a quality film and the photos were taken in good light. Not terribly impressed wiith the focus either. I have chosen 12 images only from the 36 I shot, so I don’t think I’ll be using this camera overmuch.

Out & About in Wardley

β™₯️ life
gorse of course
bullrushes at the secret lake
secret lake
Phil making hanging baskets
biker grove
Horse carrots & Turnips
Wardley Lake

Out and about in South Shields

work, live, shop
the Azura cruise ship.
sharp dressed man
playing tunes

St Wilfred’s Church & Kirkharle ~ Dec 2019

Regular readers may remember from a previous post about All Saints church in Newcastle, that a medieval font was rescued from being destroyed by the marauding, pesky Scots, and ended up in St.Wilfreds Church up in Kirkharle. Sophie and decided to hunt it down on a mixed weather day on our last outing for 2019. First, as always, get your β˜•οΈ and πŸͺ at the ready, we’ll do

The History Bit.

Kirkharle is a hamlet in Northumberland. First recorded back in days of yore (1177) it was called Herle back then and comes from even yorier Old English words for a place of worship such as  “Herela’s Grove” or “herg-leah” which means “temple-grove”, for pre-christian Angles. The origin of the church dates back to 1165 when Walter de Bolbec founded Blanchland Abbey, and linked the Herle church to it. Most of the church that stands today was built in 1336 by Sir William de Herle who founded a chantry for priests to pray for his soul, especially after his death in 1347. Not much to say about Wills, he was a British justice, appointed as an attorney to the Common Bench (a common law court dealing with common pleas that didn’t involve the King) and there’s little information on him or his family. His wiki page doesn’t mention his involvement at Kirkharle but he is mentioned in A History of Northumberland by John Hodgson published in 1827, “1240 – Little Harle Tower – ‘This mansion in the capitol seat of the manor of Little Harle, otherwise called East Harle, which in 1240, was beholden of the baron of Prudhoe by Hugh de Herle.’ 1284 – ‘Sir William de Herle, knt., was one of the great lights and worthies of Northd.’ He or his son Wm. was made ‘LORD CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS’ in 1317.” His father Sir Hugh de Herle is mentioned on the People of Medieval Scotland and People of Medieval Northern England sites as both a juror in land disputes between Scotland and England and as a plaintiff and defendant in other land deeds disputes. Anyhoo I digress.

In the 14th century the Kirkharle manor was passed into the Loraine family who came over from France not long after the Norman Conquest where Robert Loraine served under William the Conqueror. By this time the Tower, Manor, village and 1900 acres of arable land was in the hands of William del Strother, and passed to William Golddigger Loraine when he married the daughter Joanna Del Strother as it was her (very substantial!) dowry, and it stayed in the Lorain family for 400 years.

In 1664 a Baronetcy was created for Thomas Loraine, High Sherrif of Northumberland. Another William Loraine, the 2nd Baronet, built a new manor house to his own design between 1718 and 1738, replacing Harle Tower as the family home. His Grandson the 4th Baronet also called William (sigh) (1749-1809) added a couple of wings and replaced the roof. This sketch shows how it looked after Willy 4’s alterations.

Will 4 also had the original gardens removed which were attributed to Capability Brown. (More on him to come!)

The 6th Willy Baronet (1801-1849) like a lot of local landowners, went to the assistance of the Newcastle-Upon-Tyne banks which were suffering from the cost of the Napoleonic wars, and when the North Tyne Bank collapsed Willy 6 had to sell the Hall due to the declining wealth of the family. In 1836 Major Thomas Anderson, who lived in Little Harle Tower, bought the Hall, but as he didn’t need two houses promptly and exasperatingly demolished most of it except one section which he renamed Kirkharle Farmhouse. By way of compensation to posterity for this vandalism, he designed and built major extensions to Littleharle Tower, which were carried out in 1860-61. The Anderson family are still in posession of the estate.

**

There’s a handy carpark when you get there, and we were happy to see there was a cafe and some artisan shops using the farmhouse, but first wanted to walk up to the church. The first thing we came across was a stone monument. This was erected to commemorate Robert Loraine, a border reiver who was murdered in 1483. Robert was, according to a Loraine Family History of 1738, ‘a zealous prosecutor of Robbers, Thieves and Moss-Troopers’. (Actually Moss-Troopers didn’t exist back in 1483 but were brigands of the mid 1700’s who operated between the borders of Scotland and England, but as the book history was written in 1738 I presume it’s their word for persons of unscrupulous morals and the like. Much like the reivers!)

Robert lived at Harle Tower, (which we didn’t visit as it’s in private ownership), where he kept ‘a number of Horses and Arms, always ready…suitable for his estate to pursue the Scots Excursions and Depradations into Northumberland.

Erected in 1728 by Willy 2, replacing an earlier one that fell into disrepair.

He had a terrible death, having been waylaid between his house and the church by a party of men. Sir Lambton Loraine the 11th Baronet was interviewed by a journalist of The New York Times in 1874, and said the killers “determined to strike terror into the hearts of his allies, the Fenwicks,Wallingtons, Shaftoes, by the brutality of the murder”. Robert’s body was cut up “small as flesh for the pot”, then placed in the saddlebags of his horse, which was then left to make it’s way home.

We had a wander around the outside of the church

St.Wilfreds

St Wilfred (633 β€“ 709 or 710) started out a Northumbrian Nobleman, did his training at Lindisfarne, then in Gaul and Rome, returning to Northumberland in 660 where he became the abbot of a newly founded monastery at Ripon. He became famous for a speech he gave at the Synod of Whitby, advocating that the Roman method for calculating the date of Easter should be adopted. He was successful and the King’s son Alhfrith had him promoted to Bishop of Northumberland.

Back view.

Wilfred went off to Gaul to be consecrated and in the meantime Alhfrith seems to have led an unsuccessful revolt against his father, Oswiu (who you may remember in this post) and before Wilfred returned, Oswiu had put another chap, Ceadda, in the Bishopric, so Wilf went back to Ripon.

Tree & Tomb

In 668 Theodore of Tarsus became the Archbishop of Canterbury and deposed Ceaddur, restoring Wilf to the Bishopric, where for the next 9 years he worked hard establishing new churches, founding monasteries, and improving the liturgy, but Theodore wanted to break up large diocese like Wilf’s, and make them smaller. Luckily for Theo, Wilf had a barney with Ecgfrith, the King of Northumberland, who expelled him, so Theo got to implement his reforms and Wilf went off to Rome to see the Pope, Agatho, who ruled in Wilf’s favour. But old Ecgfrith wasn’t having it, and on Wilf’s return banged him up in prison, then exiled him.

Graveyard

Wilf went off to Selsey, a town by the sea in West Sussex, where he converted the pagans to Christianity, poor sods, and founded an episcopal see (a bishops eccleiastical jurisdiction). Theo and Wilf kissed and made up, and Wilf was brought back to Northumberland where a new King Aldfrith was head honcho, but in 691 Wilf was expelled by him too after quarelling over land acquisition. This time Wilf went off to Mercia where he was bishop to the Mercian King Γ†thelred. Yet again Wilf petitioned the Pope about his expulsion and the Pope ordered that an English council should be held to decide the issue. 

View between the church and the Farmhous, with evidence of medieval farming.

The council meeting didn’t go well for Wilf as the members decided to confiscate all Wilf’s possessions and so Wilfrid hot footed it to Rome to appeal against the decision. His opponents in Northumbria excommunicated him, but the papacy upheld Wilfrid’s side, and he regained possession of both Ripon and Hexam Monasteries. Wilfrid died in 709 or 710 and after his death, he was venerated as a saint.

Well now, we English are bonkers for our gardens, and the most famous English gardener was a chap called Lancelot Brown (1715/6 – 1783). Known as Capability Brown because he would tell his clients that their property had “capability” for improvement. He designed over 170 parks, many of which still endure. Lancelot was born in Kirkharle, his parents both working at the manor. He worked as the head gardener’s apprentice in Sir William Loraine’s kitchen garden until he was 23, when he toodled off down south, first to Lincolnshire, then Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, working for head gardeners for Lords and Ladies, and getting his own commissions to landscape gardens for the landed gentry. He ended up as King George III’s Master Gardener at Hampton Court Palace.

Apart from being born in Kirkharle, he was baptised in the Church but from the age of 23 never had anything more to do with the place, but he’s mentioned so much in all the history bits around the place you’d think he’d lived worked and died there! No wonder everyone else of import is reduced to a few lines! However, before he left he designed plans for a lake and stunning parkland at Kirkharle Hall, which never came to fruition. So the plans have now been updated and and his lake and associated planting were completed in 2010. It will take ages and ages for it all to grow into a fully fledged beautiful garden, but here are some photo’s of what there is so far.

The Temple (of doom??)
Tree
The Lake
Other side

Can’t say we were overly impressed, but it’ll probably look great in 50 years time!

Stay tooned for next time when we’ll look inside the Church.

refs:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkharle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkharle_Hall https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfrid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moss-trooper https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capability_Brown https://www.poms.ac.uk/record/person/9957/# http://www.pone.ac.uk/record/person/785/ https://one-name.org/name_profile/harle/ https://landedfamilies.blogspot.com/2014/07/130-anderson-of-newcastle-and-little.html

Film Friday

We are still on the sea front at South Shields, and as always, I have to photograph the Weebles when I go there. πŸ™‚

I’m quite impressed with the Canon’s close up facility.

I think this is my favourite weeble

tick tock
don’t cry

I saw a seagull having a barney with a crow

fight club

there’s the beginning verse on the other side of this, but the view through the iris isn’t as nice.

eye piece

so that was the end of my day out at Little Haven beach. See you next week!

Film Friday

I’ve had a couple of scares with the Rollei SL35, twice the film jammed after 20 frames, and on the last outing I got strange effects on some of the shots. As I’m doing a year of film I needed a back up SLR so managed to purchase a Canon EOS 1000F N for Β£19.99 on EbayIt came with a 35-80mm zoom on it, which isn’t the best lens in the world but does for now. Apparently even newish canon lenses will fit on it so I might treat it to one at some point. I haven’t had a canon before, well I did have a compact canon once but lost it. I took it out with me incase the Rollei jammed again (it didn’t) and quite like it. It’s clunky but easy to use. I had a roll of Kodak Portra 400 in it when I took it to South Shields, and here are some of the photos.

Herd Groyne Lighthouse

The pictures came out grainier than I expected considering it was a sunny day.

Frondy things

There are a lot of these frondy things by the beach, I got a bit carried away with them πŸ™‚

more frondy things

OK enough with the frondy things.

footprints (mine πŸ™‚ )
Look out post
Biking by the beach

Yep, the lens isn’t great, I can see a 50mm in my future πŸ™‚

Stay tooned for Weeble week next time!

Film Friday

I now have 2 rolls of kodak portra 400 developed. One was in my Minolta Riva Mini, and the other in my Olympus XA. The roll in the XA had been in it for over a year whilst I was busy with my 2019 385, though now and again I took it with me on outings with Sophie, so we’ll start with the shots I took with it before I decided to do a film year.

Firstly Newcastle, Christmas 2018!

Helter Skelter
Fenwicks annual Xmas window display, that year was based on The Snowman, and they were playing
‘Walking in the Air’ ad nauseum through a loudspeaker.

Pret A Manger with Grainger Street right, and Grey Street left.

I am not sure how it happens but some of the shots from the XA have come out with a red round haze in the middle of them, so I converted this one to B&W to get rid of it.

I thought this was funny, Phil not so much πŸ₯΄

I also took it with me to Dunstan Staiths, which was a Fraggle Report on the Universe blog HERE if you want to know its history.

View from the Staiths
Dunston Staiths
Fog on the Tyne
Vintage Bossa Cafe where Sophie and I had lunch that day.

A couple of miscellaneous shots to finish..

Rotterdam ferry port quite surprised this one came out, it wasn’t on a tripod. You can see the red haze in the middle but it kinda blends in with the sunset.
Sunset from my back bedroom window.

I still haven’t been out with Sophie this year as the weather has been crap most weekends, and she’s been visiting her chap in Spain on the weekends it was dry! Hopefully we can get started soon and I’ll get the Rollei on the go for some better quality shots.

Back next Friday, so stay tooned! πŸ™‚